Everyone Project Logo

 

Over the last 3 years, we have delivered courses to:

Carers

Refugees

Domestic abuse sufferers

Drug and alcohol rehab

Mental health (MIND)

 

Research

Extensive continuing research has provided us with resounding evidence of the impact of the mindfulness courses that we deliver.

Click here to find out more about our research

Our work so far

New Book - Free Chapter

Mindful Heroes

A recently published book ”Mindful Heroes – stories of journeys that changed lives” features a chapter telling the inspiring story of how the Everyone Project has grown and the people it has helped so far.

 

You can download this Free Sample Chapter (link). Royalties from sales of the book will help to fund more Everyone Project initiatives.

 

Download Free Chapter

Research

 

This research is overseen by Alan Hughes of the Mindfulness Association and Moira Harris a PhD student with the University of Aberdeen and funded by the Mindfulness Association. Julie McColl of the University of Strathclyde has also worked with us on writing up and presenting the results.

 

Initial report - Analysis of Everyone Project data

Everyone Project Cohort 2 Report - March 2018

 

 

Overview of proposed research by University of Aberdeen PhD student Moira Harris

 

Despite the increasing popularity of mindfulness based approaches there continue to be barriers to access. Those taking up training have tended to be self-funding professionals, and much of the existing research has been conducted with samples of white, middle class participants or on clinical populations, with an associated focus on treatment and pathology.  The Everyone Project seeks to broaden access by funding MBLCs for disadvantaged and isolated groups, often those living with multiple stressors.  In contrast to many other mindfulness approaches, MBLC was devised for a non-clinical population, has an explicit focus on self-compassion, and facilitates self-screening.  This is more congruent with an empowering, strengths-based approach that can bring genuine change to those who are marginalised or lack social capital.   There is, however, a lack of research on this approach.  This research proposes to explore how MBLC is experienced by a socio-economically and ethnically diverse sample, including vulnerable and isolated groups.  A mixed methods approach will be adopted, with data from standardised questionnaires measuring changes to dispositional mindfulness, perceived stress, wellbeing and self-compassion being complemented by richer data from interviews with participants about their experience of mindfulness.

Copyright Mindfulness Association 2019

Research

Extensive continuing research has provided us with resounding evidence of the impact of the mindfulness courses that we deliver.

Click here to find out more about our research